The Muslim Brotherhood is tearing itself apart

The oldest and once-powerful Islamist movement has been tearing itself apart. Leaders in Istanbul and London exchange insults, accuse each other of corruption or, worse, serving foreign spy agencies. “Instead of sacrificing themselves they are sacrificing the movement,” says Osama Gaweesh, a former Brother who lives in Britain.

The group has experienced a number of rifts in recent years, with members trading accusations of selling out imprisoned Brotherhood members in Egypt, and embezzling donor money. Some of the imprisoned Brotherhood members have pledged to reconcile with the Egyptian government. A number of Muslim Brotherhood prisoners signed a petition for their release in exchange for quitting any political activity.

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News, stories, and updates from Middle East and from the world. Critical researcher on migrant governance and human rights in Turkey and in the Mid East.

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Gagnoncharlotte

News, stories, and updates from Middle East and from the world. Critical researcher on migrant governance and human rights in Turkey and in the Mid East.