More Kurdish women are choosing to fight

A surge in recruitment has also aided by growing pushback against and awareness of entrenched gender inequality and violence over recent years. In 2019 the Kurds’ Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria passed a series of laws to protect women, including banning polygamy, child marriages, forced marriages and so-called “honour” killings, although many of these practices continue. About a third of Asayish officers in the Kurdish security services in the region are now women and 40% female representation is required in the autonomous government. A village of only women, where female residents can live safe from violence, was built, evacuated after nearby bombings, and resettled again.

Behia Murad, the director of the Qamishli Mala Jin, an older, kind-eyed woman in a pink hijab, said says the Mala Jin centres have handled thousands of cases since they started, and, though both men and women come in with complaints, “always the woman is the victim”.

A growing number of women visit the Mala Jin centres. Staff say that this doesn’t represent increased violence against women in the region, but that more women are demanding equality and justice.

The fight against Turkey is one reason to maintain the Women’s Protection Units (YPJ).

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News, stories, and updates from Middle East and from the world. Critical researcher on migrant governance and human rights in Turkey and in the Mid East.

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Gagnoncharlotte

News, stories, and updates from Middle East and from the world. Critical researcher on migrant governance and human rights in Turkey and in the Mid East.